An anti-war protestor and his tweeting companion

An anti-war protestor and his tweeting companion

Another protest this weekend in Hollywood. This one was by far less tense and unpredictable than the recent Trayvon Martin protests. Nevertheless, Brian and I were all over it taking pictures.

What really strikes me during these public events is the number of people there simply taking pictures and tweeting and not really otherwise participating. Now, of course I understand the urge to do that – that’s why I’m there myself. But its intriguing to me that it turns out to be about 1/2 of the crowd. From now on when I hear crowd estimates of a protest, I’m gonna automatically just cut that number in 1/2 to account for the looky-loos.

All this live sharing of the protest got me to thinking about the phrase, “The revolution will not be televised“. I actually didn’t know where it came from, so when I looked it up, I listened to the song for the 1st time ever.

Mainstream media reported protestors were causing traffic jams. In this moment it was actually the gawkers stopping to take pictures that had stopped traffic.

Mainstream media reported protestors were causing traffic jams. In this moment it was actually the gawkers stopping to take pictures that had stopped traffic.

The funky beat and the rebellion against pop culture seem to align with the spirit of the protest. But now, because of technology, the reporting of stories has been democratized. We are no longer dependent on news being broadcast at us one-way… or perhaps better said, that’s no longer the ONLY option. This of course raises thorny issues, many of which I addressed in my post about the Trayvon Martin protest.

No, the revolution will not be televised. But it will be tweeted.